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Roasted Sunday Pork Roast

This roast pork recipe is a guide to a perfect serving for six people on a Sunday. This simple step-by-step recipe teaches you how to prepare and roast a whole joint of pork with mouthwatering results.


Pork can be intimidating to cook because it has a bad rep for being bland and boring. But if you cook it right, it can be extremely good. Good enough for a spot on your holiday table in fact. This is my favorite roasted pork recipe.


Is there a difference between pork loin and pork tenderloin? Yes. Though both cuts are lean, uniform in shape, and mild in flavor, a pork loin roast is usually bigger and meatier.


Ingredients


2 medium onions, chopped

2 medium carrots, chopped

1 celery rib, chopped

4 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided

1 bay leaf, finely crushed

Instructions


  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Place vegetables on the bottom of a shallow roasting pan. Mix 2 tablespoons flour, bay leaf, thyme, and 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper; rub over roast. Place roast on top of vegetables, fat side up. Add 1 cup of water to the pan.

  2. Roast 1 hour, basting once with pan juices if desired. Sprinkle brown sugar over roast. Roast 10-15 minutes longer or until a thermometer reads 140°. (Temperature of the roast will continue to rise about 5-10° upon standing.)

  3. Remove roast to a platter. Tent with foil; let stand 15 minutes before slicing.

  4. Strain drippings from roasting pan into a measuring cup; skim fat. Add enough water to the drippings to measure 1-1/2 cups.

  5. In a small saucepan over medium heat, whisk remaining flour and 1/3 cup water until smooth. Gradually whisk in drippings mixture and remaining salt and pepper. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly; cook and stir 2 minutes or until thickened. Serve roast with gravy.


Freeze option: Freeze cooled sliced pork and gravy in freezer containers. To use, partially thaw in refrigerator overnight. Heat through in a covered saucepan, gently stirring and adding a little broth or water if necessary.

Kitchen Tips: Dark brown sugar contains more molasses than light or gold